HIGH SULPHATE RESISTING CEMENT (SRC)

 
 

Blue Circle High Sulphate Resisting Cement is a type of Portland Cement having a low tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and conforms to the British Standard, BS 4027.

 

 

The Product

 

Blue Circle High Sulphate Resisting Cement is a type of Portland Cement having a low tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and conforms to the British Standard, BS 4027. This standard stipulates a maximum C3A content of 3.5% to effectively provide the necessary resistance to Sulphate attack.

 

Benefits/Applications

 

Sulphate attack is by far the most common type of chemical attack, causing disruption and cracking of the concrete.  Sulphates of Sodium, Calcium and Magnesium are the main types occuring naturally in soil, ground water, sea water as well as industrial waste, sewerage.  Reactions occur between the sulphate and the hydrates from the C3A leading to deterioration of the concrete.  By limiting the content of C3A in Blue Circle High Sulphate Resisting Cement to below 3.5%, the best resistance to sulphate attack is ensured.

When the salinity on the sea water temperatures are high, or there is a hydrostatic pressure on one side of the concrete, or the concrete is of thin or slender section, Blue Circle High Sulphate Resisting Cement should be used.

Buried pipelines may be subjected to the same aggressive conditions as foundations and the same considerations apply to cement choice and concrete quality.

 

In the areas of waste management, some effluents are aggressive and these are normally found where waste products from industrial processes predominate.  Other effluents, initially innocuous, may become corrosive by processes, involving bacteria in the sea water.  Especially when the effluent is warm, protein and sulphur compunds present are converted to hydrogen sulphide; this leads to the formation of sulphates and sulphuric acid.  Blue Circle High Sulphate Resisting Cement is useful in helping to improve resistance to the attacks.

The British Standard BS8110 - structural use of concrete (part 1:1985 code of practice for design and construction section six, May 1989) provides a table of guidelines for use of different types of cement.